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New common risks to watch out for in the workplace

| Mar 12, 2021 | Industrial Workers' Injuries

Regardless of where individuals work, many are aware that the workplace could hold serious risks of occupational injuries.

As we discuss in previous blog posts, there are a few particular hazards that commonly lead to serious work injuries across industries. However, the beginning of 2021 brought a new report that details common risks that many workers might not expect.

New study names four common risk factors of work injuries

While safety is almost always a priority for workers, some jobs involve risks that cannot be avoided. And, a new report from ISN highlights certain factors that pose the largest risk of serious and fatal injuries on the job. ISN analyzed injury reports from the last three years to determine the most commonly cited causes and contributing factors.

According to the research, the primary risk factors include:

  • Working at a height: Most workers are familiar with this risk. After all, falls are one of the most common work injuries reported in many industries, especially construction.
  • Bringing chemicals on site: This is another concern common in construction and manufacturing jobs. When third parties bring hazardous chemicals to the worksite, workers face a risk of exposure.
  • Working with rigging materials: Individuals who work with rigging or in material handling often move and transport heavy objects. With the amount of equipment necessary and the objects these workers must move, it is no secret that they face a serious risk of injury.
  • Hot work: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) defines hot work as any work that involves welding, cutting, burning or work with tools that use heat. Workers whose responsibilities involve hot work could face the risk of burns or exposure to hazardous fumes if they do not have the proper protective equipment (PPE).

Most of these risks apply to similar industries. For example, both a construction worker as well as an industrial manufacturer could face almost all of these risks at some point on the job.

Managing risks is every worker’s responsibility

Maryland workers must be aware of the hazards in their workplace – whether or not those risks include any of the four listed above. Awareness of the potential risks allows workers to be better prepared and mitigate the chance of injury.

Employers have responsibilities to increase safety in the workplace, but workers must still make sure they manage risks daily on the job, especially if they face these four factors.

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  • BAR ASSOCIATION OF BALTIMORE CITY | 1880
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