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Could working too hard be bad for your health?

| Jun 11, 2021 | Workplace Injuries

There are countless hazards workers encounter on the job. Construction workers face risks associated with heavy machinery and falls from heights; office workers can struggle with repetitive stress injuries and back pain; industrial workers may encounter crushing injuries or explosions.

But no matter what job you work in, studies suggest that putting in too many hours can be bad for your health.

The risks of overworking

global study by the World Health Organization linked working more than 55 hours a week to increases in heart disease and stroke. 

In fact, workers in this group can be at a 17 percent increase of developing fatal heart disease and 35 percent more likely to have a stroke. 

These increases stem from findings that overworking can result in:

  • Excessive stress hormone releases
  • Structural lesions
  • Cardiovascular system dysregulation
  • Substance abuse
  • Physical inactivity
  • Unhealthy eating habits
  • Tobacco use

These can all cause physical problems for workers, putting them at a higher risk of suffering a fatal condition.

Protecting yourself on the job

It may seem easy to say that parties should just refrain from working more than 55 hours a week to minimize their risk for these conditions. However, this may simply not be an option for people with multiple jobs or demanding occupations.

Thus, if you cannot reduce your working hours, you might consider other ways to improve your health. Visit the doctor regularly; quit or cut back on harmful habits like smoking; practice stress-relieving activities like meditation and yoga. 

It can also be crucial to call attention to any avoidably stressful or dangerous conditions in the workplace. 

Earning a living should not come at the expense of a person’s health. However, every day, workers struggle with unsafe work environments and employment expectations that can be harmful. Anyone experiencing illnesses or injuries related to their job would be wise to discuss whether they may be eligible for legal and financial remedies to help them get healthier and recover from work-related conditions.

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